Saliva test could lead to better parasite control

Researchers at the Western College of Veterinary Medicine (WCVM) are looking for a more accurate way to detect internal parasites in beef cattle by looking at the animals’ saliva.

New CT scanner creates more slices of life

Drs. Lesley Zwicker and Sally Sukut can’t hide their enthusiasm for the Western College of Veterinary Medicine’s new computed tomography (CT) scanner that’s pushing the boundaries of veterinary medical imaging.

New program brings vet students into rural Saskatchewan

A new program through the Saskatchewan Veterinary Medical Association (SVMA) is giving third-year veterinary students an opportunity to gain more hands-on experience before starting their final year at the Western College of Veterinary Medicine (WCVM).

Dual degree sets up veterinarian for lifelong learning

One of the biggest lessons Dr. Alex Muzzin has learned as a small animal veterinarian is to pay almost as much attention to the people walking through her doors as she does to the pets they bring with them.

WCVM to operate Canada’s first PET-CT unit for animals

The Western College of Veterinary Medicine (WCVM) at the U of S will soon be home to Canada’s first PET-CT unit dedicated to animals—thanks to an Alberta donor whose $2.5-million gift is the largest private donation in WCVM’s history.

Toe tip necrosis painful problem among feedlot cattle

Toe tip necrosis syndrome (TTNS), a painful disease that mainly affects the hind feet of cattle, was once thought to be a rare occurrence in North American feedlots.

Vet Topics (Summer 2018) now online

The Summer 2018 issue of Vet Topics — news publication for the WCVM Companion Animal Health Fund — is now available online.

Poultry powers B.C. vet’s career

For many people, poultry is simply another option in a long line of dinner ideas. But for Dr. Stewart J. Ritchie, president of Canadian Poultry Consultants Ltd. and S.J. Ritchie Research Farms Ltd., chickens (feathers) are a way of life.

Veterinarian’s work supports growing aquaculture industry

If you’re looking to feed a lot of people, and feed them well, it only seems sensible to look for the largest beast on four legs you can find. Cows, pigs or even goats should fit the bill, right?

U of S student receives prestigious international award

A University of Saskatchewan PhD student in the Western College of Veterinary Medicine is one of five recipients worldwide of the inaugural BioOne Ambassador Award announced today.

Equine veterinarian’s life comes full circle

For 15 years of her life, Dr. Maia Aspé has ridden horses. Six of those years were spent chasing a career as a professional hunter-jumper before she found her calling in equine veterinary medicine.

Safeguarding food supply key part of B.C. vet’s role

When most people think of veterinarians, it’s likely that their first thoughts include a dog or cat — maybe even a horse — being nursed back to health and returned to its relieved owner.

Puzzling disease devastates B.C. rabbits

Veterinarians and rabbit owners in British Columbia are on alert for a devastating viral disease that has caused the death of hundreds of rabbits in the province this past spring.

One very determined dentist

Dr. Candace Lowe, a member of the Norway House Cree Nation in Manitoba, is a role model on many fronts: she’s female, Indigenous and an example of what’s possible when a person finds her passion.

Study shows signs of Cache Valley virus in Saskatchewan

A recent baseline study at the Western College of Veterinary Medicine (WCVM) indicates a high prevalence of antibodies against Cache Valley virus (CVV) in Saskatchewan sheep as well as in other domestic and wild animals living in the province.

WCVM scientists gain support for biomedical research studies

A recent funding announcement by the Saskatchewan Health Research Foundation (SHRF) includes nearly $540,000 in financial support for four research projects that will be conducted by researchers at the Western College of Veterinary Medicine (WCVM).

Little things in life make researcher’s day

Microbiologist Moses Ikechukwu’s enthusiasm for his research work is infectious — spending even 20 minutes with him can put anyone in a good mood. His passion for learning was passed down to him from his parents who sacrificed a great deal for their son’s education in Nigeria.

U of S research team aims to develop salmonella vaccine

With 94 million cases of gastroenteritis — “stomach bug” — every year worldwide, protecting against salmonella is more relevant than ever.

Vet happy to be rolling on Manitoba highways again

When Dr. Meagan Peats describes her average workday, her portrayal includes climbing behind the wheel of an equine ambulatory vehicle and hauling down dusty roads, past wide-open fields and into makeshift driveways to help treat horses of all shapes and sizes.

Low oxygen therapy has high potential for spinal cord patients

Expose patient to low oxygen levels intermittently for short time periods. Combine with rehabilitative training. Repeat. They’re simple instructions for treating people and animals with spinal cord injuries, but the results have proven to be breathtaking.

WCVM clinician-scientist earns global prize for eye-catching research

A Western College of Veterinary Medicine scientist and her team’s groundbreaking research earned international attention at the European College of Veterinary Ophthalmologists (ECVO) Congress in May 2018.

Raw meat study connects dental and veterinary worlds

Second-year dentistry students Jessa Drury, Lisa Bachiu and Susanne Skulski were sitting in their endodontics class when they came up with the idea of how they could connect their schooling at the University of Saskatchewan’s College of Dentistry with veterinary medicine.

Toxic leftovers from Giant Mine found in snowshoe hares

Even though it was closed decades ago, the Giant Mine on the outskirts of Yellowknife has left a long environmental legacy.

Vet school prepared equine surgeon for his life’s work

There’s never been a time in Dr. Chris Bell’s life that he wasn’t surrounded by horses.

Innovation in horse rehabilitation

Samantha Steinke was born to ride. In fact, the University of Saskatchewan student essentially rode her first horse before she was even born.

U of S prof receives prominent international animal science award

On June 4, University of Saskatchewan professor H.A. (Bart) Lardner received the Extension Award from the American Society of Animal Science (ASAS).

Pigs came calling for WCVM graduate

When Dr. Blaine Tully graduated from the Western College of Veterinary Medicine (WCVM), it was a given that he would return to his home province of Manitoba. Home and family beckoned.

Surgical solution for PPID?

A Western College of Veterinary Medicine (WCVM) researcher is working to develop a surgical technique that could, one day, provide a long-lasting fix for pituitary pars intermedia dysfunction (PPID) in horses.

No free rides for bats slows spread of white-nose syndrome

Whether you’re a tourist who is planning a cross-country camping trip or a trucker hauling freight from Toronto to Vancouver, you can help slow the spread of a devastating wildlife disease called white-nose syndrome (WNS) by checking to ensure that you’re not giving a bat a free ride.

WCVM scientists develop vaccine for lethal poultry virus

Researchers at the Western College of Veterinary Medicine (WCVM) have developed a vaccine that can prevent inclusion body hepatitis (IBH), a particularly lethal virus that affects the poultry industry by causing sudden death to young broilers — chickens that are bred and raised for meat production.

Lambs and calves help prepare students for practice

Fourth-year veterinary students at the Western College of Veterinary Medicine (WCVM) have many different options when choosing their clinical rotations, and with each rotation, they gain valuable hands-on experience. But WCVM reproduction specialists Drs. Colin Palmer and Dinesh Dadarwal thought something was missing from the list: a neonatal rotation focusing on ruminants.

Playtime for piglets

It’s playtime for piglets at the Prairie Swine Centre (PSC), where Western College of Veterinary Medicine (WCVM) researcher Dr. Yolande Seddon hopes to find out whether piglets that play are better able to cope with life’s stresses.

Studies aim to detect endometriosis at early stages

What do dogs, pigs, and sheep have to do with endometriosis in humans? Dr. Emy Varughese, 30, is a small animal veterinarian at Banfield Pet Hospital in Springfield, Ohio, and, after being diagnosed with endometriosis, she's on a mission to find out.

Hamilton selected as FEI official for Games

Dr. Don Hamilton, professor emeritus of the Western College of Veterinary Medicine (WCVM), is one of four Canadians who have been selected as officials for the 2018 Fédération Équestre Internationale (FEI) World Equestrian Games this fall.

Do female pigs want to get fit or full?

Do stall-housed sows want to exercise? Or are they happy staying put and eating more? That’s one question swine ethologist Dr. Yolande Seddon and a team of researchers are working to answer.

U of S researcher awarded $2 million to study swine welfare

University of Saskatchewan researcher Yolande Seddon, working with 14 industry partners, has been awarded a Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council (NSERC) of Canada Industrial Research Chair (IRC) in swine welfare worth nearly $2 million in total.

Wolverine research in the North

In the past 40 years, research into wolverine parasites has been as elusive as the animals themselves. Fortunately, that situation is changing, and PhD candidate Rajnish Sharma is the latest researcher to turn his sights on parasites affecting these carnivorous mammals.

Visualizing psychiatric illness risk factors with X-rays

Researchers at the University of Saskatchewan (U of S) are zeroing in on a neurological protein that may be instrumental to the development of psychiatric illnesses such as schizophrenia, bipolar disorder and depression.

Ducks’ feathers hold key to measuring impact of stress

Habitat loss, changes in weather, food scarcity, predator-versus-prey situations – each day wild animals are faced with these potential stressors. But what’s the cost?

Hearing ear dog helped by aquatic therapy

Vera Rosin has had an important connection with dogs since she was a child.

On the wing: repairing the great horned owl

Like most veterinarians, I spent many hours embroiled in an assortment of volunteer work prior to acceptance into vet school. In particular, I enjoyed discovering the medicine and rehabilitation of birds of prey through the Orphaned Wildlife Rehabilitation Centre (OWL) in Delta, B.C.

Researchers use human medicine to further equine research

While unexpected results can lead to headaches and frustration for everyone involved, they proved to be a bonus for a team of researchers from the Western College of Veterinary Medicine (WCVM).

Keep pot away from pets

Sleepiness, lethargy, a “drunken” stupor – these signs are no laughing matter when it comes to marijuana and your pets.

The vet behind the PowerFloat

Ask any horse owner or equine veterinarian about the PowerFloat, and they’ll tell you that the rotary dental instrument is synonymous with equine dental care — an essential tool that’s well known in the horse community.

The "protein illusion": nitrogen doping in pet food

Having trouble deciding on a new pet food for your furry family member? With the hundreds of pet food brands stocked on store shelves, choosing the most nutritious one can be a daunting task for any pet owner.

Angiostatin breathes new life into research targeting ARDS and cancer

It all began with the case of three kittens that were found in severe respiratory distress after a day spent in a laundry room with a home air purifier running.

Understanding X-rays can save dollars and lives

Dr. Jiaying Ng’s interest in the topic of gas in the abdomen began when she helped care for a canine patient that developed this potentially serious issue three weeks after surgery to remove a foreign body.

Scientists strive to revive Canada’s wood bison herds

Straddling the boundary between northern Alberta and the southernmost tip of the Northwest Territories lies Wood Buffalo National Park, the widest-reaching patch of federally-protected wilderness in all of Canada.

Moya targets better welfare, productivity balance for beef cattle

In early January, the Western College of Veterinary Medicine (WCVM) welcomed its new beef cattle ethologist — Dr. Diego Moya — to the college’s team of large animal specialists.

The world’s most expensive pig disease

For pig producers around the world, porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) is one of the most economically devastating and dreaded diseases.

Animal protection act change will clarify veterinarian’s role

Saskatchewan will soon join six other Canadian provinces that require veterinarians to report suspected animal neglect or abuse to animal protection agencies.

Moving forward with sheep dewormer resistance

What will sheep farmers do when the dewormers they’ve been using for years are no longer working?

RapidArc advances cancer centre plan

The newly-acquired RapidArc radiation technology is a key part of the Western College of Veterinary Medicine’s plan to establish a centre for comparative oncology at the University of Saskatchewan, says WCVM Dean Dr. Douglas Freeman.

Rapid radiation

State-of-the-art radiation technology is transforming cancer treatment at the Western College of Veterinary Medicine (WCVM).

Radiation therapy buys time for beloved husky

When Scott Vosper brought his Siberian husky Koda in to the WCVM Veterinary Medical Centre for radiation treatment in February 2017, he knew he was only buying his much-loved companion some extra time.

Reining in equine obesity

Imagine you’re a draft horse. The year is 1927 and you spend most of your time hooked up to a plow in the field, burning calories and muscle. You dine primarily on grain. It’s important to keep your energy up because you work hard every day and your family depends on you.

Sookie's second chance

During the week before Christmas in December 2016, Shannon Hamilton and John Kunard's dog Sookie went missing from their acreage near Shellbrook, Sask.

Co-operation key to CWHC’s 25-year success

It's a rare person who looks upon research on rats – the unwelcome kind – as the study of urban wildlife.

Early detection of EMS has big benefits

Weight-related health problems are a growing concern in the world of equine medicine just as they are in the world of human medicine.

Drugs in my tack box

Much like human sport competitions, irresponsible medication use and a positive drug test can cause serious problems for both the horse and rider at equine events.

Planning key to protecting horse's health

As a horse owner, you're always on the lookout for potential risks to your horse's well being at home and on the road.

Location key issue in assessing wounds

Horses can suffer from all types of wounds, and while some wounds look much worse than others, the primary assessment of their severity is the same as that of gauging housing prices: location, location, location.

Vet Topics (Winter 2017) now online

The Winter 2017 issue of Vet Topics is now available online.

Saskatoon set for One Health conference

Saskatoon has won the bid, led by the University of Saskatchewan (U of S), to host the 2018 International One Health Congress, an event that is expected to bring more than 1,000 researchers and health professionals from around the world to share their work and create new research collaborations.

Watch for holiday dangers to family pets

While the holidays are a joyous time for many people, the extra hustle and bustle of large gatherings can make it easy for household pets to get into trouble unnoticed.

Could brushes give clues to cattle health?

Could the grooming behaviours of dairy cows be used to tip off the farmer that a cow's not feeling well?

U of S research finds good news for caribou

A University of Saskatchewan (U of S) research team has found that the woodland caribou population in the Boreal Shield region of Saskatchewan has been slightly increasing over the past two years and currently exists at a high density for the species in Canada.

What to do if you suspect colic

Most horse owners have their own personal stories to tell about colic — but chances are that everyone's tales about the dreaded disease are different.

Bruno recovers after long stay at WCVM

When Cindy and John Billesberger's missing dog Bruno was found at the bottom of an abandoned well near their Estevan-area farmyard, they were astounded that the seven-year-old chocolate Labrador retriever was still alive.

Horse Health Lines (Fall 2016) now online

The Fall 2016 issue of Horse Health Lines, news publication for the Townsend Equine Health Research fund, is now online.

Great blue heron heals at WCVM

When a large bird fell from the sky in front of a woman walking in downtown Saskatoon, the quick thinking citizen brought it directly to the Western College of Veterinary Medicine (WCVM).

Bruno in stable condition at VMC

A dog that spent 27 days trapped in a well near his family's home is recovering at the Western College of Veterinary Medicine's (WCVM) Veterinary Medical Centre (VMC).

One Health spans spectrum of healthcare

After 9/11 occurred in 2001, food protection and biosecurity became major concerns for everyone in the United States.

Project offers unique support to horses

In August 2015, I left the comfort of my English village and headed out to Canada to join a unique research team at the University of Saskatchewan (U of S).

Remarkable recovery for injured puppy

Ashley Woodvine recounts the unbearable drive into Saskatoon, Sask., after her puppy Sharley was run over.

Ferret adrenal disease demystified

Adrenal disease causes ferrets to lose all of their fur, but despite their alarming appearance, these bald pets aren't in any pain as long as their condition is properly managed.

Farm-to-fork link changes face of dairy

Growing up on a mixed farm outside of Regina, Sask. inspired a passion for agriculture in Janna Moats at an early age.

Forest-loving moose thriving on farmland

While populations of moose have been declining in much of their North American range, research from the University of Saskatchewan (U of S) shows how these icons of the northern boreal forest are finding success by moving south into farmers' fields.

Fungus threatens salamanders and newts

The fate of the world's richest biodiversity of salamanders and newts is in the hands of pet owners across North America, said Natacha Hogan, an environmental toxicologist specializing in amphibians at the University of Saskatchewan.

Researchers examine aquatic painkillers

Until recently, veterinarians removed tumours, installed prosthetic eyes and performed other painful medical procedures on beloved pets as well as on animals in zoos and aquariums without providing their patients with any painkilling drugs.

Scientists seek reasons behind fish die-off

On a normal summer day at Buffalo Pound Lake, beachgoers bask in the sun to the soothing sound of waves lapping onto the beach – and the hum of mosquitoes. But for 11 straight days in June 2012, this southern Saskatchewan paradise was disrupted by waves of dead and dying yellow perch washing onto shore.

Rabbit dental health ever-growing concern

Laura Driver knew something was wrong with her lionhead rabbit Twix, but what she didn't know was that her pet was critically ill from a dental problem.

New prof builds animal nutrition program

Dr. Tammy Owens jokes that she has almost enough cats at home – seven – to run a valid feeding study, something entirely appropriate for someone who specializes in animal nutrition at the Western College of Veterinary Medicine (WCVM).

Bolt flies free

Dr. Brandy Kragness let go of the wild bird she had cared for all winter and watched "Bolt" swiftly launch himself into the wind, flying strong and sure across the stubble field.

Preg-checking may boost producer's profit

Record high cattle prices. A declining Canadian dollar. Drought across Alberta and Saskatchewan. While these headlines might not grab the attention of veterinarians at first, there are very good reasons for them to pick up a paper. All of these issues have a huge impact on a cow-calf producer's bottom line.

Injured puppy gets second chance

It was hard to tell by the way he squirmed and wagged his tail in the arms of the veterinarian holding him, but one young puppy recently faced a difficult journey to the Western College of Veterinary Medicine's (WCVM) Veterinary Medical Centre.

The birds next door

Bird health and the conservation of declining bird species are unifying themes for a new avian research centre on campus.

Meet the seal team

It is high noon on the ice shelf off Ross Island — it is always high noon in February in Antarctica — and Dr. Rob McCorkell, Dr. Gregg Adams and Michelle Shero are clustered around the south end of a northbound Weddell seal, trying to determine if she is pregnant.

Equine drug study leads to rule change

Results from a Western College of Veterinary Medicine (WCVM) study have led to a nation-wide change in Equine Canada-sanctioned competition rules regulating the use of the drug firocoxib in performance horses.

EHV-1 case dies from other health issues

The horse was the first of two local equine patients diagnosed with EHV-1 in the past two weeks. Veterinarians from the Western College of Veterinary Medicine (WCVM) were providing treatment and supportive care for the horse at its home stable.

Nerve blocks: working from the bottom up?

As the saying "no hoof, no horse" implies, the diagnosis and resolution of lameness is critical to a horse's life.

Beef the “loyal lifesaver”

If Beef was a human being, he'd likely be getting a letter of recognition from Canadian Blood Services.

EHV-1 confirmed in horses near Saskatoon

Equine herpes virus 1 (EHV-1) has been confirmed in two horses with neurologic disease being boarded at a stable near Saskatoon.

Temperature and equine inflammation: link?

After spending several years of her academic career dedicated to improving the understanding of equine inflammatory processes, Dr. Stacy Anderson knows her fair share about why horses and inflammation don't mix.

Intensive care gives Angus a new life

It was an early morning in August when Tyrone Kennedy-Bush of Kindersley, Sask., let his three dogs out for the day.

Phoenix the panda visits the WCVM

Phoenix the red panda recently visited the Western College of Veterinary Medicine (WCVM) for a check-up and received a clean bill of health from wildlife veterinarians.

Scientists seek definitive ergot diagnostics

Every summer a vast mosaic of grain crops blossoms across the Canadian prairies. But once they begin flowering, these plants become susceptible to Claviceps spp., fungi that are the source of major problems for the agriculture industry and the focus of a Western College of Veterinary Medicine (WCVM) research study.