Understanding the “bacterial bond” between mother and baby

A collaborative study that includes researchers from the University of Saskatchewan (USask) and the University of British Columbia is focusing on an unusual but significant aspect of the relationship between a mother and her infant.

Bats waking up to viral reactivation

I feel like a predator. Only my target isn’t a blood meal – it is something far more precious.

Fruit flies could help scientists achieve fruitful research

It’s hard to imagine a fruit fly being more than an unwanted nuisance around the ripe fruit in your kitchen, but researchers in Dr. Adelaine Leung’s lab at the Western College of Veterinary Medicine (WCVM) have found uses for the insect in more ways than you would think.

Bacteria-killing molecules may be key to new mastitis therapy

A Western College of Veterinary Medicine (WCVM) researcher and his team are taking a molecular approach to finding a new way of treating a common health issue in the dairy industry.

Health plan prioritizes Indigenous-led agenda

Supporting Indigenous individuals and their communities to drive Indigenous health research is a key goal of the new five-year plan of the national Institute of Indigenous Peoples’ Health (IIPH), a Canadian Institutes of Health Research institute based at the University of Saskatchewan (USask).

Getting objective insight into your pet’s vision

Imagine this: you notice that your dog is bumping into corners and objects, and you begin to suspect that he’s starting to lose his sight.

Veterinarian looking at ways to manage TB in northern bison herd

A Parks Canada scientist is conducting research on bovine tuberculosis in bison to improve diagnosis of the disease and to develop better vaccines. This research is conducted in collaboration with the University of Saskatchewan and the Canadian Bison Association.

Playing ‘bee’ to study pesticide effects

Pretending to be a honey bee is a lot of work, but researchers at the Western College of Veterinary Medicine (WCVM) have proved they’re up for the challenge.

WCVM opens Canada’s first PET-CT unit for animals

Western Canada’s regional veterinary college, based on the University of Saskatchewan (USask) campus, is now home to Canada’s only PET-CT unit dedicated to clinical use in animals as well as for animal-human research studies.

First cases show potential of PET-CT unit’s diagnostic capacity

The new technology has only been operating for two months, but Canada’s only PET-CT unit dedicated to clinical use in animals is already improving the care of patients at the Western College of Veterinary Medicine (WCVM).

Does Fido really need that antibiotic?

Most people know the dangers of taking antibiotic drugs for a flu or cold that doesn’t require treatment, but do pet owners understand that the same rules apply for their beloved dogs and cats?

Collaboration helps researchers solve real-world problems

Dr. Arinjay Banerjee (PhD) has always been a gifted student. However, as happens with many graduate students, the way Banerjee thought about his research was flawed at its core. It wasn’t until 2014, when he came to the University of Saskatchewan, that he realized it and changed.

Dipping into mare’s milk

Milk samples are providing vital information about iodine levels in western Canadian brood mares — the focus of a recent study led by theriogenology specialist Dr. Claire Card of the Western College of Veterinary Medicine (WCVM).

Fund receives legacy gift from Saskatoon vet

The Companion Animal Health Fund (CAHF), a veterinary research fund at the University of Saskatchewan, has received a significant legacy gift from the estate of Dr. Michael Powell, a beloved small animal veterinarian who served the Saskatoon community for 35 years.

WCVM scientists awarded nearly $1.5 million in research funding

Researchers linked to the Western College of Veterinary Medicine (WCVM) have been awarded $1,495,000 to address a wide range of issues including preventing pregnancy loss in horses, evaluating tick-borne diseases, and protecting pigs from influenza A infection.

Funds propel $175,000 worth of pet and horse health studies

Have you ever wondered how veterinarians prepare tiny exotic pets for surgery or thought about how equine clinicians can help horses recover from a tendon injury?

Therapy may reduce muscle atrophy in spinal cord injury patients

A team of researchers at the University of Saskatchewan (USask) is investigating a therapy for spinal cord injuries that could potentially increase patients’ motor function and decrease muscle atrophy at the same time.

USask researchers awarded nearly $11 M in natural sciences, engineering grants

University of Saskatchewan (USask) researchers have been awarded nearly $11 million to tackle wide-ranging and critically important issues including cannabis, water quality, and swine flu.

Merck Animal Health announces $250K investment to advance livestock and forage research

The University of Saskatchewan today announced details of a 10-year, $250,000 investment from Merck Animal Health for its Livestock and Forage Centre of Excellence (LFCE) – a visionary research facility located southeast of Saskatoon.

Turning the tide for the bigmouth buffalo fish

The bigmouth buffalo fish, or Ictiobus cyprinellus, is one of 67 fish species found in Saskatchewan waters, but it is also one of the six fish species currently at risk of extirpation (gone from a once-populated area) in the province.

Imported spices and frozen vegetables tested for “superbugs”

A University of Saskatchewan research team has found that some food imported to Saskatoon from certain Asian countries has tested positive for “superbugs”—strains of antibiotic-resistant bacteria— but immediate health concerns are likely low.

$1.25M awarded to innovative USask early career researchers

Five University of Saskatchewan early career researchers have each been awarded $250,000 over two years by the New Frontiers in Research Fund, a new federal fund designed to promote exploratory research that crosses disciplinary boundaries and enables researchers to take risks and be innovative.

Wild pigs invade Canadian provinces—an emerging crisis for agriculture and the environment

Wild pigs—a mix of wild boar and domestic swine—are spreading rapidly across Canada, threatening native species such as nesting birds, deer, agricultural crops, and farm livestock, research by the University of Saskatchewan (USask) shows.

Investigating tularemia on the Canadian Prairies

Between June 29 and July 19, 1978, a group of seven monkeys at Winnipeg’s Assiniboine Park Zoo mysteriously fell ill.

USask ecologist receives prestigious Steacie Fellowship

Maud Ferrari, an exceptional University of Saskatchewan (USask) behavioural ecologist who studies predator-prey interactions, has received one of Canada’s most prestigious awards for young scientists.

Shining a new light on old cases: looking to the past to improve cancer care

When an eight-year-old Labrador retriever named Ruby was brought to the Veterinary Medical Centre (VMC) at the Western College of Veterinary Medicine (WCVM) in 2016, her owner reported symptoms that had started with the loss of sensation in her back legs, followed by the loss of bladder control and eventually her ability to walk.

USask research shows dogs reduce distress of patients waiting for ER care

A visit from a dog can reduce the distress of patients waiting for emergency treatment in hospital, a study by the University of Saskatchewan (USask) shows.

New CFI funding will foster long-term sustainability of two USask national research facilities

Two University of Saskatchewan (USask) research centres—the Canadian Light Source and VIDO-InterVac—will receive a total $13.4-million increase in operating support over two years from the Canada Foundation for Innovation (CFI)—one third of the total $39 million awarded nationally to seven facilities.

Let the kisses spread love, not worms

If your dog enjoys a meal of raw organs and considers feces a delicacy, you may want to rethink trading kisses with them – and not just because of bad breath and bad bacteria.

HSPB1: small protein a potential pregnancy powerhouse

The statistics are staggering: preterm or premature birth affects 15 million babies worldwide. These infants, born at fewer than 37 weeks of pregnancy, are at a greater risk for complications such as cerebral palsy, development delays and sight or hearing problems.

Fish under threat release chemicals to warn others of danger

Fish warn each other about danger by releasing chemicals into the water as a signal, research by the University of Saskatchewan (USask) has found.

Understanding the patterns of superbug resistance in dogs

Even if your dog is perfectly healthy, there’s a chance that it could be at risk of developing an infection caused by bacteria with superbug bacteria – and treatment options are decreasing.

Vaccine development speeding up at USask

The Vaccine and Infectious Disease Organization-International Vaccine Centre (VIDO-InterVac) at the University of Saskatchewan (USask) is embracing new technology.

New policies needed to combat grain fungus of cattle

USask research has shown that beef cows that ate ergot-contaminated feed showed signs of poisoning even at concentrations deemed safe by Canadian livestock guidelines, and after a short-term exposure to the toxin.

USask team developing unique harness to help save injured horses

University of Saskatchewan (USask) researchers are working with RMD Engineering Inc. of Saskatoon to create a unique harness designed to help in the recovery and rehabilitation of horses from limb injuries. Such injuries are often fatal because currently available equipment is inadequate for proper treatment.

Research on display at student poster day

While it might not seem like respiratory diseases in beef cattle have much to do with evaluating stress in wild birds, or with studying yeast-fermented pet food, but the common link is that these are all topics of research projects led by Western College of Veterinary Medicine (WCVM) graduate students.

USask awarded CFI funding to research new antibiotics and food products

SASKATOON – Two researchers at the University of Saskatchewan (USask) have been awarded a total of $274,119 by the Canada Foundation for Innovation (CFI) to buy equipment crucial to studies into antibiotics and novel food products.

USask launches new master’s in field epidemiology

The University of Saskatchewan (USask) is preparing to take bold new steps in the study and control of disease in animal health with a new Master of Science degree program in field epidemiology.

Scientists pitch research to funding agencies

It wasn’t quite the Dragon’s Den, but beef and forage scientists participated in a day-long pitch party with funding agencies this week.

Rehab dogs help children with cerebral palsy walk

Dogs can help children with cerebral palsy walk and gain self-confidence and independence, according to new research by the University of Saskatchewan (USask).

New USask treatment for bone cancer in young people and dogs

Teenagers and pet dogs stand to benefit from a novel therapy for bone cancer being developed at the University of Saskatchewan (USask).

Ramp walking helps diagnose lameness in dogs

Researchers at the University of Saskatchewan’s Western College of Veterinary Medicine (WCVM) are taking tips from the field of human medicine and rehabilitation to develop a technique to help detect and diagnose injuries in dogs.

Water quality research first project in state-of-the-art metabolism barn and labs

The first scientific study in the Saskatchewan Cattlemen’s Association Metabolism Barn at the Livestock and Forage Centre of Excellence will identify how different levels of sulphates in water affect beef cattle.

Small, deadly parasite emerging in Canada’s North

Harsh terrain and brutally cold temperatures are not the only dilemmas Arctic dwellers face. Dr. Emily Jenkins and her team of researchers at the University of Saskatchewan’s Western College of Veterinary Medicine (WCVM) have identified parasites in the gastrointestinal tract of carnivores from northern Canada as Echinococcus spp, a small tapeworm no larger than a mustard seed. Despite its miniscule size, Echinococcusis is extremely dangerous.

USask discovery may help improve CF treatment

A University of Saskatchewan medical research team has made a groundbreaking finding with potential to lead to more effective, longer-lasting and better-tolerated treatments for cystic fibrosis (CF).

Llama drama: Research into the mechanics of llama ovulation reveals a rare tumour

All it took was one ultrasound image to change all of our plans. I was part of a research team from the University of Saskatchewan’s Western College of Veterinary Medicine (WCVM) investigating how llamas ovulate. The season was just gearing up and we were doing the usual reproductive-function exams on the 25 research llamas at the college’s llama and alpaca farm near Saskatoon.

Boehringer Ingelheim forges partnership with USask Livestock and Forage Centre of Excellence

The University of Saskatchewan has announced a five-year partnership and $250,000 contribution from research-driven pharmaceutical company Boehringer Ingelheim (Canada) Ltd. that will support advancements in innovation and leadership at the Livestock and Forage Centre of Excellence (LFCE).

Researchers seek clues to better treatment for deadly dog disease

Taking your adorable new puppy to play at the dog park: priceless. Potential cost of not fully vaccinating your puppy first: several days in the veterinary hospital, thousands of dollars in intensive-care fees … and still no guarantee your puppy will survive.

Six world-first vaccines among USask’s VIDO-InterVac contributions to global health

The University of Saskatchewan (USask) Vaccine and Infectious Disease Organization-International Vaccine Centre (VIDO-InterVac) has established itself as a leading global institute in protecting human and animal health since 1975, with six world-firsts among the eight vaccines it has commercialized.

Volker Gerdts named new USask VIDO-InterVac director and CEO

Following an international search, Dr. Volker Gerdts has been selected to lead the University of Saskatchewan’s (USask) Vaccine and Infectious Disease Organization-International Vaccine Centre, a world leader in infectious disease research and vaccine development.

USask researchers find changing environment bringing bear species together

In an unprecedented finding, University of Saskatchewan (USask) researchers have recorded all three species of North American bears occupying overlapping territory in Canada’s subarctic.

Collaborative research is the key to the LFCE

The newest kid on the block for researchers at the University of Saskatchewan is a world-class facility that brings together under one roof all aspects of raising livestock in a sustainable and environmentally responsible manner.

Big on beef, passionate for poultry

They are both passionate about animal welfare and about research advancements to improve the agriculture industry.

Is temperament linked to stress in beef cattle?

Understanding how cattle behaviour relates to productivity, immune status and welfare is a key research focus for Dr. Diego Moya, beef cattle ethologist at the Western College of Veterinary Medicine (WCVM).

Stressed bats can increase spread of deadly viruses

Bats are responding to stress from such things as habitat destruction, lack of nutrition and infections by increasing the production and shedding of viruses that cause serious and often fatal diseases in humans and other animals.

U of S Livestock and Forage Centre of Excellence celebrates grand opening

On Oct. 9, the University of Saskatchewan (U of S) and its partners launched the $38-million Livestock and Forage Centre of Excellence (LFCE), a world-class complex of field and science laboratories that will be a powerhouse for innovative research, teaching and industry engagement in all aspects of livestock and forage production.

Lifesaving support

When a person breaks a leg, it’s highly unlikely that this injury would lead to death. But when a horse injures its leg, the all-too-common outcome is euthanasia.

U of S researchers awarded $8M to tackle social, climate issues

University of Saskatchewan (U of S) researchers have been awarded more than $8 million for projects ranging from designing videogames that promote social bonding to safeguarding Indigenous people from the northward spread of a nasty parasite, to reducing greenhouse gas emissions from the cattle industry.

U of S appoints new director for its Livestock and Forage Centre of Excellence

The University of Saskatchewan (U of S) has appointed Kris Ringwall as the new director of its Livestock and Forage Centre of Excellence (LFCE), a powerhouse for innovative research, teaching and industry engagement in all aspects of livestock and forage production.

How a new vaccine could save cattle herds – and livelihoods

For 10,000 years, the bacterium Mycoplasma mycoides has infected goats, cows and other livestock, annihilating entire herds in days.

What makes sulfa drugs tick?

Sulfa-based drugs – anyone with a penicillin allergy and an ear infection can testify that these antibiotics are still important today. Dating back to the 1930s, these drugs are some of the first antibiotics used to combat infections — especially urinary tract infections — in both human and veterinary medicine.

Ferrari earns spot in Royal Society of Canada college

University of Saskatchewan veterinary biomedical scientist Dr. Maud Ferrari has earned a spot in the prestigious Royal Society of Canada’s (RSC) College of New Scholars, Artists and Scientists, which celebrates research excellence at an early career stage.

Saliva test could lead to better parasite control

Researchers at the Western College of Veterinary Medicine (WCVM) are looking for a more accurate way to detect internal parasites in beef cattle by looking at the animals’ saliva.

New CT scanner creates more slices of life

Drs. Lesley Zwicker and Sally Sukut can’t hide their enthusiasm for the Western College of Veterinary Medicine’s new computed tomography (CT) scanner that’s pushing the boundaries of veterinary medical imaging.

Toe tip necrosis painful problem among feedlot cattle

Toe tip necrosis syndrome (TTNS), a painful disease that mainly affects the hind feet of cattle, was once thought to be a rare occurrence in North American feedlots.

Vet Topics (Summer 2018) now online

The Summer 2018 issue of Vet Topics — news publication for the WCVM Companion Animal Health Fund — is now available online.

U of S student receives prestigious international award

A University of Saskatchewan PhD student in the Western College of Veterinary Medicine is one of five recipients worldwide of the inaugural BioOne Ambassador Award announced today.

Puzzling disease devastates B.C. rabbits

Veterinarians and rabbit owners in British Columbia are on alert for a devastating viral disease that has caused the death of hundreds of rabbits in the province this past spring.

Study shows signs of Cache Valley virus in Saskatchewan

A recent baseline study at the Western College of Veterinary Medicine (WCVM) indicates a high prevalence of antibodies against Cache Valley virus (CVV) in Saskatchewan sheep as well as in other domestic and wild animals living in the province.

WCVM scientists gain support for biomedical research studies

A recent funding announcement by the Saskatchewan Health Research Foundation (SHRF) includes nearly $540,000 in financial support for four research projects that will be conducted by researchers at the Western College of Veterinary Medicine (WCVM).

Little things in life make researcher’s day

Microbiologist Moses Ikechukwu’s enthusiasm for his research work is infectious — spending even 20 minutes with him can put anyone in a good mood. His passion for learning was passed down to him from his parents who sacrificed a great deal for their son’s education in Nigeria.

U of S research team aims to develop salmonella vaccine

With 94 million cases of gastroenteritis — “stomach bug” — every year worldwide, protecting against salmonella is more relevant than ever.

Low oxygen therapy has high potential for spinal cord patients

Expose patient to low oxygen levels intermittently for short time periods. Combine with rehabilitative training. Repeat. They’re simple instructions for treating people and animals with spinal cord injuries, but the results have proven to be breathtaking.

WCVM clinician-scientist earns global prize for eye-catching research

A Western College of Veterinary Medicine scientist and her team’s groundbreaking research earned international attention at the European College of Veterinary Ophthalmologists (ECVO) Congress in May 2018.

Raw meat study connects dental and veterinary worlds

Second-year dentistry students Jessa Drury, Lisa Bachiu and Susanne Skulski were sitting in their endodontics class when they came up with the idea of how they could connect their schooling at the University of Saskatchewan’s College of Dentistry with veterinary medicine.

Toxic leftovers from Giant Mine found in snowshoe hares

Even though it was closed decades ago, the Giant Mine on the outskirts of Yellowknife has left a long environmental legacy.

Innovation in horse rehabilitation

Samantha Steinke was born to ride. In fact, the University of Saskatchewan student essentially rode her first horse before she was even born.

U of S prof receives prominent international animal science award

On June 4, University of Saskatchewan professor H.A. (Bart) Lardner received the Extension Award from the American Society of Animal Science (ASAS).

U of S researchers named to Arctic groups

With renewed global interest in Arctic resource extraction opportunities, transportation and tourism, tackling issues such as climate change, sustainable development and social and health impacts on Indigenous residents is becoming important for Arctic nations.

Surgical solution for PPID?

A Western College of Veterinary Medicine (WCVM) researcher is working to develop a surgical technique that could, one day, provide a long-lasting fix for pituitary pars intermedia dysfunction (PPID) in horses.

WCVM images earn coveted spots on journals’ covers

Microscopic images taken by two Western College of Veterinary Medicine (WCVM) students have earned the coveted cover spots on two different scientific journals.

WCVM scientists develop vaccine for lethal poultry virus

Researchers at the Western College of Veterinary Medicine (WCVM) have developed a vaccine that can prevent inclusion body hepatitis (IBH), a particularly lethal virus that affects the poultry industry by causing sudden death to young broilers — chickens that are bred and raised for meat production.

WCVM graduate student’s agar art among finalists

Dongyun Jung, a graduate student at the Western College of Veterinary Medicine (WCVM), has had his bacterial artwork selected as a finalist in the Agar Art 2018 competition.

WCVM students excel at annual U of S research expo

The University of Saskatchewan’s annual Life and Health Sciences Research Expo was held on May 3, with many of the Western College of Veterinary Medicine (WCVM) students clinching top honours in the event’s categories.

Playtime for piglets

It’s playtime for piglets at the Prairie Swine Centre (PSC), where Western College of Veterinary Medicine (WCVM) researcher Dr. Yolande Seddon hopes to find out whether piglets that play are better able to cope with life’s stresses.

Studies aim to detect endometriosis at early stages

What do dogs, pigs, and sheep have to do with endometriosis in humans? Dr. Emy Varughese, 30, is a small animal veterinarian at Banfield Pet Hospital in Springfield, Ohio, and, after being diagnosed with endometriosis, she's on a mission to find out.

Record number of entries for graduate student poster day

Graduate students entered a record number of 45 research posters in the annual Western College of Veterinary Medicine’s (WCVM) Graduate Student Poster Competition that took place on April 4.

Do female pigs want to get fit or full?

Do stall-housed sows want to exercise? Or are they happy staying put and eating more? That’s one question swine ethologist Dr. Yolande Seddon and a team of researchers are working to answer.

CFI funds high-tech tools at U of S for cancer, water and food security research

Five researchers at the University of Saskatchewan (U of S) have been awarded a total of $625,000 by the Canada Foundation for Innovation (CFI) for state-of-the-art equipment that advances leading-edge work in precision medicine, water research and swine welfare.

The fishy problem of underwater noise pollution

When the famous explorer Jacques Cousteau released The Silent World, a documentary of his underwater adventures in 1953, he inspired generations of scientists to study the world’s oceans.

WCVM student among U of S Images of Research winners

Research at the University of Saskatchewan (U of S) is a community affair, as shown this year by the composition of winners in the fourth annual U of S Images of Research competition. 

U of S researcher awarded $2 million to study swine welfare

University of Saskatchewan researcher Yolande Seddon, working with 14 industry partners, has been awarded a Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council (NSERC) of Canada Industrial Research Chair (IRC) in swine welfare worth nearly $2 million in total.

New U of S CIHR awards help improve health of Canadians

The University of Saskatchewan has been awarded six project grants totalling $4.45 million in the fall 2017 competition of the Canadian Institutes of Health Research, nearly doubling its success rate to 15.4 per cent success from spring 2016.

Wolverine research in the North

In the past 40 years, research into wolverine parasites has been as elusive as the animals themselves. Fortunately, that situation is changing, and PhD candidate Rajnish Sharma is the latest researcher to turn his sights on parasites affecting these carnivorous mammals.

Visualizing psychiatric illness risk factors with X-rays

Researchers at the University of Saskatchewan (U of S) are zeroing in on a neurological protein that may be instrumental to the development of psychiatric illnesses such as schizophrenia, bipolar disorder and depression.

Ducks’ feathers hold key to measuring impact of stress

Habitat loss, changes in weather, food scarcity, predator-versus-prey situations – each day wild animals are faced with these potential stressors. But what’s the cost?

Tapeworm potentially risky for pets and people

The beauty of nature: lush forests, chirping birds, babbling brooks and intestinal parasites.